Fun-tastic Fitness, Part 2. Indoor Fitness Fun

In my last post, I shared the grim statistics that most Americans are not getting enough daily physical activity to warrant health benefits, and also that most people see exercise as a chore, which decreases the likelihood that they will engage in it. In an encouraging light, research also confirms what we suspected was true… that “the health status of the parents is intricately linked to that of their children.” In other words, the health habits of children typically reflect the habits of the parents (with the exception of the bottomless intake of sugar a child can ingest, particularly after a parade).

The encouragement in this type of research reflects the power of influence that parents have over their children’s healthy habits.  Possibly more than education, income, zip code, peer influence and other factors, parents wield power to show children wellness by living it out for them to see on a daily basis.  Even if unhealthy habits are being practiced, the effect of seeing parents battle their habits and eventually win sends powerful and lasting messages to the child that individuals have control over their wellness.

So in light of that hopeful news, I want to continue to Part 2 of Fun-tastic Fitness Ideas. Last time I offered you some fun outdoor exercise ideas, and this time I want to highlight some indoor fitness ideas. These are some of my tried and true experiences with my kids and also with my siblings growing up. I would love to hear what other ideas parents, caregivers or babysitters have come up with!

  • Catch You: As mentioned in last post, this game works great inside also, often dispelling whiny toddler moods into giggles. Just use the cue words, “Catch You!” and start chasing the child. Once caught, tickle or toss the child onto the bed. This usually turns into the next activity…
  • Airplanes: Laying on a bed, have the child stand by your feet and you hold his hands and slowly lift him up, keeping your feet pressed up against his torso, til he is over you in the air, like a plane. Gently bring the plane down to either side for a landing. (Not a recommended activity shortly after eating!)
  • Dancing: Turn on some upbeat music and have a jam session. Actually even mellow music is fine too. I invented my own style of ballroom dance with my 2 year old to the tune of Pachelbel on our keyboard’s song list. Now he turns it on and dances on his own.
  • London Bridges: Classic game of London Bridge Falling Down…you rest your head, neck and shoulders on couch or stability ball while kids crawl under you as you hold the glute bridge position. When you finish the song, you drop (lightly) down on the unfortunate child caught underneath you. Variation: Do Marches in the bridge position.
  • Ping-Pongballoon
  • Balloon Volley-Wally-ball: Divide a room in half with pillows/blankets/scarves, and use an inflated balloon to play volleyball. All the rules of regular volleyball apply
    (except net rules, since there’s no net), in addition to playing the “ball” off of furniture & walls. Set one boundary in the back for service line and the out-of-bounds area. General rule of thumb, anything is a legit hit until it hits the floor!
  • Basket rides: Similar to weighted sled pushes for athletes, this variation puts the child (and likely stuffed animals) in a laundry basket and you push them around the house. Be prepared for tired hamstrings.
  • Jumping contests: Use a broom or yardstick to challenge children and adults alike to see how high they can jump over the stick. Another option is long jump contests..see who can jump the farthest.
  • Stability ball or Bosu bouncing and balancing: Bouncing—Place child on ball but hold it steady with your feet (if sitting) as you bounce them up and down. Balancing—Kneeling on the ball and using wall or couch for support as needed, compete to see who can kneel the longest without holding on or falling off (recommended for older kids).
  • Family Challenge Chart: Pick various exercises (squats, planks, pushups) and make a chart for daily or weekly challenges. Either on the honor policy or with a witness, record each performer to see how many he can do in a minute, or how long she can hold a plank.
  • Whippa!: A true home-spun game that will one day be patented…use two pieces of furniture (ideally couches) as the safe areas. One person is “it” wielding a winter scarf, and must be kneeling while she is it. Runners dash back and forth between couches trying to avoid getting “whipped” by the scarf. If tagged 3 times, the runner becomes it.

 

 

References: Vedanthan et al. April 12, 2016. Cardiovascular Health PromotionFamily-Based Approaches to Cardiovascular Health. promotionhttp://www.onlinejacc.org/content/accj/67/14/1725.full.pdf

 

 

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