A Corny Debate: Vegetable, Grain or Fruit?

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Some weeks ago, I asked my 3 year old son to name his favorite vegetable. He paused for a second, then replied with the unsurprising answer, “Corn.” As he answered, in my head I thought, “How do I explain to a toddler that corn is actually a grain, not a vegetable?” It’s a good thing I kept that thought in my head, because as it turns out, Corn is probably not who you think it is. Corn actually goes by several food groups, of course most popular as a vegetable. Yet the fact that corn rose to such popularity as to become the official state grain of Illinois in 2016 shows that this veggie-grain is doing some serious campaigning in the grain department as well.

As summer cookouts and corn on the cob sales flourish, I thought it timely to dedicate a post to increasing corn knowledge. Since corn (aka maize) appears in many of our food products, is the most abundant crop grown in the US (and many countries), and even appears in many of our non-edible items (i.e. plastic!) it’s helpful to learn what makes this plant so versatile, and so clever to end up in several food categories.

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Corn on the cob is considered sweet corn, one of many corn types.

Like many of my recent learning adventures for the past few years, the topic of corn began with my toddler son who happens to be devoted to anything tractor related, specifically green John Deere ones. In the many farming YouTube videos and children’s books, I’ve learned much more about farming than (surprisingly) I did growing up working on a vegetable farm. In our latest library venture, I picked up a book with a simple title, “CORN.” How could I guess that a child’s book would send me searching for more information on a single crop?

As I soon learned in the first few pages, there are many varieties of corn…primarily six, including sweet corn, dent corn, flint corn, pod corn, popcorn, and flour corn. As you can guess, sweet corn is the most popular type as a vegetable for human consumption. What makes it a vegetable is that it is picked before maturity and before the starch really begins to form, which makes it edible as it is. The longer the corn kernels remain on the cob, they begin to harden and become inedible in their raw form.

I learned this earlier in the year in the fall as we walked by some friends harvesting their corn. My little farmer man insisted on an old fashioned corn husking party, and earned himself several ears of popcorn. Later that night and the next few days, I shucked the hardened kernels off the cobs, heated some oil in a pan and tossed in the kernels and enjoyed the little people entertainment of popping our own popcorn.

 

Aside from homemade popcorn, the other types of corn are useful for human consumption also. Dent corn, although mostly used for animal feed, can also be processed into foods like cereal, cornmeal, tortilla chips, grits, tortillas and of course our ever-controversial, high fructose corn syrup. Surprisingly, the starch from this corn variety can even be used to make plastics! Dent corn can be grouped together with flint and flour corn and generally known as Field Corn. These corn types are also popular for producing ethanol, a corn-derived fuel.

Getting down to the plant itself explains why it becomes difficult to put corn into a food group. While not claiming any botany expertise, I did become fairly proficient in understanding corn’s reproductive parts as explained in CORN, after reading it for two weeks straight (who’s thankful for library due dates?!?).  What I came to learn is that each kernel on a corn cob is actually a seed, which is how it can in one sense be labeled a fruit.  The silks coming down the tassel contain little things called carpels, which become kernels when fertilized by the pollen. So next time you experience irritation at those pesky strings caught in your teeth, remember that without those silks, there would be no kernels to enjoy!

As alluded to earlier, when the kernels stay on the cob to full maturity, usually in the fall season, they become hardened as the higher sugar content matures into starch.  Because these hardened kernels become the endosperm, germ and bran of the plant, it now is classified as a grain. From this stage, various corn products can be made, but one example is cornmeal, which has several processing varieties. If you’ve shopped for corn flour or cornmeal in the past, you may have been confused by the options. Here is a run-down on how the kernel processing can affect the final product:

  • Masa flour: Fine ground cornmeal that has been soaked in an akaline solution like limewater, used for tamales and tortillas
  • Steel-ground yellow cornmeal:  The husk and germ of the kernel is mostly removed, and can be conserved for about a year in an airtight container.
  • Stone-ground cornmeal has some of the hull and germ and thus retains more flavor and nutrition. It is more perishable than steel ground, but will store longer in refrigerator. 
  • White cornmeal made from white corn, is common in Africa and in southern US for making cornbread.
  • Blue cornmeal is light blue or violet in color and gets its color from whole blue corn that has a sweet flavor. The cornmeal is typically ground into a fine or medium texture.

 

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Ground cornmeal comes in several varieties.

You can see now in just a few ways what makes corn so versatile that it has become a staple plant around the world. Beyond that, it also boasts a solid nutrient profile being  high in potassium and fiber, contains several B-vitamins, phytochemicals, unsaturated fat and even a decent amount of low-quality protein and also is gluten free.

So as I conclude my brief report on corn, I would pose to my audience that perhaps it is time to move away from focusing all our attention on the tomato in the vegetable vs. fruit debate, and start including corn in the conversation. And as corn continues to rise in popularity as the number one plant and kids favorite vegetable, I think it’s time to start explaining to our posterity that there’s more to corn than they might realize. I for one, am adequately impressed at corn’s versatility, although I’ve yet to be convinced that it should go to the the cows….

Stay tuned next time for some corny, grainy recipes.

 

References: (ok, it’s all Wikipedia today, but it has some great info on it!)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dent_corn

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cornmeal

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_corn

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maize

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sweet_corn

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_grain

https://www.glnc.org.au/grains/types-of-grains/maize-corn/

Walls, Celeste. “The Power of Ten. Top 10 Produce Crops in the US.” https://agamerica.com/power-of-10-top-10-produce-crops-in-the-u-s/.

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Change! Ya’ll Ready for This?

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A fellow trainer friend (we’ll call her “Cupcake”), has a pesky habit of consuming large quantities of sweets, and recently conveyed to me that she agreed to a seven day detox with another friend following the holidays. The intent, like many quick diet fads, had the intent of resetting the body, both of bad habits and unhealthy foods, all without the long term commitment of actually fixing the habits and the added bonus of losing a few pounds in a week.

And because I’m a true friend, I listened graciously to Cupcake’s grand plans of eliminating everything but melons, berries and 1 gallon of water for Day 1, followed by a more satiating Day 2 of raw veggies with a baked sweet potato for lunch. The detox finale worked its way up to Feast Day of Cabbage Soup on Day 7.

So on Day 1, I sent her my text of encouragement to ask how the detox was going. Still in New Year’s Resolution-Motivational Mood, she responded (in part), “About to go to the store to buy more fruit and the rest of what I need for the cleanse. Because no matter what, I’m going to finish it!”

Six hours later, the struggle became apparent once the cravings started coming. Cupcake: “…besides craving real food, the biggest challenge is trying to drink a gallon of water a day. Makes it hard to nap when every 5 min you have to go on a pee break.”

But because she’s a Spartan, I knew her intrinsic motivation to better her health would kick in to overcome her cravings. So when the next text came in around dinnertime, I had to step back to grasp the reality of Cupcake’s failure. “8 hours into the cleanse, the hunger got the best of me. Tried to be strong but couldn’t go on.” [Included: photo of a perfectly cooked store bought pizza, rising crust.]

Although part of me desired Cupcake’s success in her detox trial, experience beckoned me to realize the odds were against her. (Plus, a success story is much less entertaining.) So I felt it timely in our one week anniversary of the new year, to analyze why resolutions and goal setting might not be in the best interest of your health, and to propose that behavior change might be the better bet this year. That may sound like a contradiction, but slight differences exist in these goal setting mindsets. Although not entirely separate from one another, behavior change almost always must precede goals for resolution success.

To be honest, this comes from a somewhat hypocritical  perspective, as I’m notorious for setting New Year’s Resolutions each year. But I’ve also developed a system for my resolutions, before realizing that I was actually employing behavior change techniques. So I want to share with you a few of those techniques, plus others, to help encourage you in developing new healthy habits, one at a time.

To start off, let’s break down what I mean by behavior change. To do that, I need to talk about habits. Some estimates state that 40% of our daily activities are done out of habit. Things like getting out of bed, our morning routine, checking our phone in the car, etc. become unconscious activities that we don’t expend extra energy thinking about them. Many of them have benign effects on our well-being, so we don’t think much of them. Others, however, can be presented up against knowledge that they may be harmful (i.e. smoking, bad diet), but still that knowledge does not deter practice.

The concept behind behavior change is assessing what long term accomplishments you want to change (weight loss, happy marriage, grateful children) and taking daily mini-steps to accomplish that end. It means tweaking the 40% of the mindless activities you do each day, and convert one of them into a mindful, intentional activity until that new activity also becomes mindless, i.e. a habit. Some of them are borne out of necessity (adapting to kids’ school schedule), and others borne out of convenience (keeping a burp cloth in every room). Still other habit changes arise when we encounter a heart change. These, I would argue, become the most difficult to address, because they require an acknowledgement of failure in the past, and the desire to set a higher standard for ourselves.

Despite the mantra that “nobody likes change,” some changes like the first examples can be fairly easy, because they elicit early positive rewards to make the new habits stick (i.e. kids at school, I now have free time). Habits of the heart, however, require something a bit deeper and perhaps, more costly of us, not always with immediate rewards, and therefore have a higher failure rate.

Early on in my personal training career, I had a hard time comprehending the necessary heart change of clients towards fitness success. I was baffled that people would ask me for advice, and even hire me to help them, and then not do any of the things I suggested.  I believed in change by osmosis…people would change based on the knowledge I offered them.  Ten years later, I’ve learned much more about human behavior, and realized that’s it not me who can convince you to change. The only person you can convince is yourself.  However, there are a few tools I can offer to help you make small changes, which I’ve found (and so has some research) to be invaluable to the process of human behavior change.

1. Acceptance.  Before you start analyzing what you need to change in your life, accept yourself as a person. Many times body weight issues stem from self acceptance issues. You may feel guilty for being overweight or not exercising, but at the same time maybe the guilt comes from abandonment, abuse or other psychological issues from the past. Accept that as part of your struggle, and make the positive your motivation, not the negative. Trying to make changes based on guilt, fear or shame can leave you feeling exhausted trying to please someone else (even if that “person” only exists in your mind). If self-acceptance is an area of struggle, consider hiring a Health Coach or Counselor to develop positive reinforcement for your character.

2. Surrender. Similar to acceptance, but this concept is more spiritually minded. Although you may not find a lot of research on meditation correlating specifically to behavior change, you can find a lot on the benefits of meditating in general. Related to this is the practice of visualizing and positive thinking, seeing in your mind how you want things to go. A great passage from the Bible says this, “…we take every thought captive…(2 Corinthians 10:15).” A necessary step in behavior change is acknowledging your failure in current habits, and realizing the need for help in order to change. Without this step, we will continue to seek out ways to succeed on our own…signing up 6-week Body Makeovers, 7-day Diets, unused gym memberships, and more. Surrendering acknowledges that you don’t have the answers, and you will listen for healthy ways to change.

One of my favorite authors, Max Lucado, offers this anecdote on thinking in his book, Anxious for Nothing, “Your challenge is not your challenge. Your challenge is the way you think about your challenge. Your problem is not your problem; it is the way you look at it.” 

3. Choose one. It’s easy to get carried away on January 1 with all the New Year, New You concepts, but to increase your odds of success, just choose one thing to work on in the immediate future. The great thing about behavior change is it’s evolving. If your goal is weight loss, think about the mindless habits that might contribute to that, and focus on changing one of them (rather than say, a detox). One example might be the practice of setting the entire pot of spaghetti on the table, taunting you after you finished your plate. A behavior change would involve keeping the pot on the stove, or even packing it up after making your plate. That diminishes the temptation to eat more before realizing you’re already full. 

4. Companionship. My friend referenced earlier, Cupcake, had asked me about my plans for this year, specifically if I intended to run any races this year (after 2 kids, I have taken a unintended hiatus for the past 4 years). I gave my assent in this conversation that indeed, I was hoping to start racing again, even ordered new running shoes after Christmas. A few days later, I received a message from another friend asking about doing a half marathon in April. Time to commit my words to real goals. The point is, whatever you want to achieve this year (or whenever), and you know it’s going to be a tough goal, seek support. (I would add that often when you surrender first, you will discover companionship around the corner.) Whether it’s a Facebook group, a magazine or email subscription, or a personal buddy, find people doing what you want to do, and be inspired by them.

4. Self-talk/Interviewer: Ideally in your wellness journey, you would have access to a competent and well trained Health Coach to assess your motivation and help bring out your emotions towards change. In reality, most people try to succeed on their own, and if that’s you, just keep this technique in mind. Ask yourself questions constantly. When the ice cream is calling as the kids finally doze off, ask yourself…Why do I want ice cream right now? Is there something else I can eat instead of ice cream? Is ice cream in any way going to help with my fitness goals? How much sugar is in ice cream? And the crucial part here…Answer your questions! Don’t just let them pop up and flitter away; take time to answer these inquiries, even if only in your head. This is a powerful step in behavior change, because as mentioned earlier…only YOU can convince yourself to do something, or not do it. If you are fortunate enough to have a spouse or friend that is a good listener, chances are they might be good at asking questions also. Invite the person along on your journey so he or she can ask you insightful questions that encourage change (*NOT Judgement!) in your habits. Stopping old habits and starting new habits are KEY to successful behavior change.

5. Readiness. For many professionals who work with behavior change clients, they must make motivational assessments, determining how ready the person is in making the changes discussed. The client will fall into 1 of 5 categories: Precontemplation, Contemplation, Preparation, Action, and Maintenance. Without getting into category specifics, it is helpful for anyone who wants to make changes to assess their readiness before expending time, money and energy into a failed endeavor. For example, one time I had a client with goals of weight loss and improved eating habits. After a few questions on past diets and what he thought would be helpful changes for the future, he conceded that in reality, he was not going to change his habits. He likes food too much, and when he thinks about a burger, he has to have one…that’s not going to change. This client was in Precontemplation, because he did not see the long term benefits of a modified diet, and predicted that change will be too difficult to adhere to. Achieving goals will not come in this mindset. Instead, you must be prepared for the challenges change may bring, and then act on them. So before you start a new change, think about how much you believe this change is necessary, and identify possible barriers to making the change.

So no matter what changes you are looking for in your life, whether it’s health, marriage, stress, parenting, or even happiness, I hope a few of these insights will be of benefit to you. If you happen to be in the category of “My goal is not to set any goals,” then maybe you will be nudged over to the behavior change side, even if it’s just an inch. We could all use a behavior tune-up periodically. Besides, who doesn’t want to see an Improved You? Happy New Year!

*A note to add here, asking meaningful questions is very different than judgmental ones. Meaningful would be, How are you doing with the diet changes? What changes have you been able to make? What are you struggling with? Judgmental sounds like, Why are you eating that?!? I thought you said you wanted to lose weight? Why don’t you ask Susie Q. what she eats? She’s in good shape. Learning the difference in this type of communication is the key between being a guilt-driver or an encourager.

 

References:

Archer, Shirley. “Meditation: Push-ups for the Brain.” https://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/meditation-push-ups-for-the-brain. December 11, 2012.

Muth, Natalie Digate. “The Secrets to Behavior Change, Practices and Principles.” https://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/the-secrets-to-behavior-change-principles-and-practice. May 7, 2015.

Newell, Jessie. “Motivation, Behavior Change, and Program Adherence.” https://www.acefitness.org/fitness-certifications/resource-center/exam-preparation-blog/3808/motivation-behavior-change-and-program-adherence. April 7, 2014.

Price, Derrick. “The 6-Step Approach for Creating New Habits.”  http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/habit-based-coaching-finding-the-right-cues-to-reap-rewards. May 9. 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanksgiving Success: Mini Pumpkin Pies, Vegan and Dairy Free

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Thanksgiving provides a great opportunity to reflect on gratitude, especially for the seemingly little things in life.  When it comes to healthy baking, I am constantly grateful for the pioneers who ventured before me, who revamped and tested staple recipes themselves so that I don’t waste my pricey ingredients on trial baking sessions. Yet I always approach the new recipes with slight trepidation that if I miss a step or don’t have the right ingredients, a recipe fail will still end up in my oven. So it is with great joy and gratitude that I submit a humble as pie Thanksgiving recipe that arises partly from another baker (pie crust), and partly from my own concoctions (pie filling).

A little background for the adventure, if anyone wants a story…. I tend to be a last-minute, when-the-mood-strikes type of baker, which means it doesn’t happen too often. If you read my last post on the effects of sugar on the body, you get an idea why I stopped baking. But then Fall comes around, and inevitably I buy a pumpkin or two, starting off as decoration in my yard before progressing to decoration on my pie plate. (If you’ve never baked a pumpkin or squash, I recommend giving it a try…it’s very easy, plus the seeds make a nice toasted snack as well!)  And now that my son is old enough to think he is a professional chef, he also knows that pumpkins need to be made into pumpkin pies.

So of course I added an unplanned incentive to the potty training begging routine…after you go, you can help me make a pumpkin pie.  (Let’s face it, food is an incentive at any age, right?)

But then I start to follow through on my incentive, and start checking cupboards and fridges…butter? Not much. Condensed milk? Nada. Sugar? Honey, liquid stevia and small amount of brown sugar…not really pie material.

Next step: Google.

Answer: Coconut Oil Pie Crust and Almond Milk Pumpkin Pie filling.

Jackpot.

Despite the sugar shortage, we made it through the first trial run with an actual pie. However the next day we still had leftover pumpkin and pie crust dough. Plus I had already donated my test pie to a willing friend, so now I had no pie, and no pie plate. So we made an actual trip to the store to buy more sugar, although not “real sugar;” a mix of cane sugar, stevia and erythritol (sugar alcohol).

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Although there is some disagreement out there, the general consensus seems to be in favor of sugar alcohols providing a safe and lower-calorie option to regular sugar (does not raise blood sugar or impede weight loss). So  I decided to give this option a shot for my baking experiment.

And I’m happy to report that with my baking adventures, I produced a tasty pie treat for almost half the calories of a regular slice of pie! According to my recipe input on MyFitnessPal, this recipe should yield 180 calories per serving, and only 3.8g of sugar, compared to 323 cal for a slice of pie (not including whip cream!) and 25g of sugar!

So take a look around the house, you might have the ingredients on hand to serve a lower calorie, lower sugar, and much cuter version of the pumpkin pie this Thanksgiving.

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Vegan Mini Pumpkin Pies

Serves: 14

Pie Crust (as adapted from the Minimalist Baker

2 Cups Unbleached White Flour

2/3 Cup Organic, Virgin Coconut Oil, softened, not liquid

3-6T Ice Water

Pumpkin Pie Filling

3 Cups Fresh Pumpkin Puree (or 2- 15oz canned pumpkin)

1/2 C Truvia Sugar Cane Blend

2 Tsp Ground Cinnamon

1/4 Tsp Ground Nutmeg

1/4 Tsp Ground Ginger

1/2 Tsp Sea Salt

1 C  Unsweetened Almond Milk

Directions:

Preheat Oven to 350 F.

*Pie Crust: In a large bowl, gradually scoop in coconut oil and mix either by hand or with fork into the flour until it resembles sand texture. Gradually add in water to bind dough together until it forms a ball. Transfer to floured surface to roll into a medium sized disc, then use a knife to cut the disc into 14 strips. Form each strip into a ball, and on a floured surface, roll each one into a small disc. Transfer the discs to a greased or non-stick muffin pan, patting dough into the pan to form muffin shells.

Filling:  In another large bowl, mix the pumpkin and spices together first, then add the milk and whisk until smooth. Using a ladle, scoop filling into each pie shell. Bake for 45 min or until toothpick comes out clean from the pie filling. Let cool and Enjoy!

*The crust ingredients can also be used to make one regular 10 inch pie crust instead of mini pies.

Nutrition info:

Serving Size: 1 pie

Calories: 180

Carbs: 21.8g              Fat: 11.4g             Protein: 2.7g              Sugar: 3.8g

Cholesterol: 0g          Sodium: 12.8g       Potassium: 106.3g   Dietary Fiber: 1.1g

Vitamin A: 39.9%         Vitamin C: 3.9%     Calcium:   4.2%      Iron: 8.8%

Percent Daily Values Based on 2000 Calorie Diet.

Shipwrecked by Sugar

I’ve been clean for nine months (except for occasional bites). I’ve managed to walk past bowls of my past addiction without a second glance. The plates sitting on every table at church don’t even whisper my name anymore. And all the Sirens at the grocery store have silenced their enchanting songs to lure me into their islands. The shipwreck of sugar cravings finally got lost at sea, and I’m not headed back to find where it landed.

It’s not easy to own up to one’s destructive habits, especially if you have a career in health and wellness. Yet for that very reason, I knew it was imperative to find a solution so I could effectively coach others to find it themselves. And one week after Halloween, I’m happy to  report that we have only one Tupperware of chocolates in the house (primarily for potty training purposes), and of those, I’ve eaten maybe 3. And not out of cravings, mostly boredom.

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So I want to tell you that breaking sugar cravings is possible.

 

But before I talk about solutions, let’s review why added sugar is a killer for any healthy diet, and why life is better without them. Let’s talk a few numbers and examine the typical American diet. Although the USDA recommended sugar intake is no more than 6-10% of the daily caloric consumption, most Americans consume 16-20% of their daily calories from added sugar.  What that means in real numbers is that while no more than 6-9 teaspoons, or less than 25g, should be consumed in a typical day (for a typical 2000 daily calorie diet) the typical American is consuming 32g of sugar EVERY day!

 

 

Along with that, added sugar consumption is linked to an increase in cardiovascular disease, increasing the risk 38% compared to those who follow low-sugar food plans.  It can also negatively impair memory, artificially increase appetite, decrease energy levels, lead to diabetes, increase body weight and cause joint inflammation.

Why? How does such a sweet tasting additive bring so much suffering to our lives? The answer lies in its metabolism process, and the fact that the ingredients find their way into the majority of packaged foods. In the body, sugar is metabolized in the liver, but when the liver is overloaded, it turns it into fat. This is where it leads to a myriad of problems as fat cells inhibit regular cell function.

Where?  If you think you are following a healthy diet, yet still raging against a constant sweet tooth, it may be time to take inventory of your food intake.  Consider that a typical “healthy” flavored Greek yogurt yields 20g of sugar by itself, and you start to see where part of the problem comes from.  Other common “healthy” food saboteurs include protein bars/shakes, cereal, sauces, applesauce, sweetened nut milks, beverages, breads, low-fat foods and condiments (ketchup, peanut butter, jams). The more obvious not-so-healthy products include creamers, pastries, sodas/sports drinks, candy, fruit snacks, ice cream and alcohol.

A great handout I use regularly for my clients gives an overview of typical sugar content in various foods. In it, you see that iced tea can have almost 10g per 16oz bottle, 20 oz soda almost the equivalent in g/oz at 19.25g, and some kids cereals coming in at 10g/serving! So imagine if you consumed one serving of each of these per day…you’d be already at almost 40g of sugar, and you haven’t even enjoyed your evening bowl of ice cream yet!

Help!  By now you may be realizing that your diet is leading you too for a major shipwreck, as it was doing to me.  Or you might be at that point already if you experience the myriad of maladies pointed out earlier. So it’s time to get to the solutions!

1-Nutrition Labels: If you haven’t picked up on in yet, the biggest habit you should start doing is READING LABELS!!! I can’t emphasize this enough, as this small rectangle on your package will literally tell you if what you hold in your hands will help or hinder your health. After looking at the calorie count per serving, scan to the sugar section. You might even notice an update from previous years, as many manufacturers are switching to the new mandate for 2018 to state the amount of added sugars in the product. This helps the consumer differentiate between natural occurring sugars (as in fruit) and all other sweeteners.

The next step is to check the Ingredients. If you see sugar as the first ingredient (unless of course, it IS sugar), PLEASE put it back on the shelf! This part of the label tells you everything you need to know about content, because sometimes certain ingredients (like trans fat) don’t have to be reported numerically if they fall under a certain percentage of the overall content. Knowing where sugar falls in the lineup will help you determine if the item is as “healthy” as it’s designed to be.

2-Drink More Water.  I’m sure you’ve heard this mantra a million times in your life, but that doesn’t make it any less true. Not only does drinking water curb your overall appetite, it can also keep you from consuming other sugar laden beverages that derail your best sugar-fasting intentions.

 

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Natural Peanut Butter, only 2g/ 2T

3-Proper Diet…Keep it Simple: I doubt anyone really needed me to say this, but sometimes it’s hard to decipher what actually are healthy food choices on the store shelves, since manufacturers design products to make them seem nutritious. So follow a few guidelines: 1- buy A LOT of produce;  2-eat 100% whole grains (multi-grain, whole wheat, bran cereal), not refined grains (bleached flour); 3-Avoid Low-Fat foods (especially in the dairy section), as they typically hold more sugar to offset the lower fat content; 4-Avoid artificial sweeteners, although low in calories, they inhibit weight loss and the body does not metabolize them well, which leads to weight gain.

 

 

 

4-Exercise. Of course, I have to say that…it’s my job. But the reality is that in addition to curbing appetite, exercise can also increase your mitochondria metabolism, which means your body doesn’t have to work as hard to process sugar, especially when it becomes overloaded (hello Holiday season!).  Also on a diabetic note, walking after eating has been shown to decrease glucose levels. And realistically speaking, hopefully going for a walk will distract you from satisfying the sweet tooth!

5-Eliminate Pastries. Last but not least, the inevitable target of sugar fails starts either in the oven or on our grocery list. It doesn’t matter if the label or recipe says honey, agave, maple syrup, organic cane sugar or regular ol’ molasses…it’s all added sugar and the body digests it the same way.  So even as the holiday season begs us to celebrate with heaven’s buffet of pastries, I’m telling you it’s not in the best interest of your body, and your body does NOT take a holiday. In fact, I would argue you need your energy levels to be at its peak over these next two months for an enjoyable holiday season. So take a nibble if you must, or eat a small butter cookie, but leave the whipped cream desserts and banket for someone else.

And to weave a parenting note in all of this, your eating habits influence the little ones around you. It’s understandable that potty-training bribery plays a role in parenting, but the rest of the eating habits literally determine a child’s nutrient profile and can set them up for medical problems later if sugar intake isn’t controlled. And of course, as parents, we need all the energy we can get to keep up with those rascals, so don’t let sugar rob you of living the good life…including during the little years!

 

 

References:

American Council on Exercise. “How Sugar Affects Your Body.” https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/professional/expert-articles/5128/how-sugar-affects-your-body. Oct. 28, 2014.

Asp, Karen. “Sugar Shock: Why Experts Say It’s Time to Get Serious About Taming That Sweet Tooth.” https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/professional/prosource/april-2014/3767/sugar-shock-why-experts-say-it-s-time-to-get-serious-about-taming-that-sweet-tooth. April 2014.

Halvorson, Ryan. “Why Those With Type 2 Diabetes Should Walk After Dinner.” http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/why-those-with-type-2-diabetes-should-walk-after-dinner. Dec. 14, 2016.

Webster, Sandy Todd. “Nutrition Facts Panel Puts Spotlight on Added Sugars.” http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/nutrition-facts-panel-puts-spotlight-on-added-sugars-0. Aug. 19, 2016.

Webster, Sandy Todd. “When Sugar isn’t Sweet.” http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/when-sugar-isnt-sweet-0. April 16, 2014.

“Sugar Facts & Fiction.” http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/sugar-facts-fiction. Aug. 15, 2008.

Keller, Joy and Judy Meyer. “What Added Sugar Looks Like.” http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/what-added-sugar-looks-like. Oct. 23, 2015.

 

Souped-Up Soup

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With Fall weather attempting to breeze it’s way in (although summer is fighting a valiant battle yet), it’s time for us mammals to start winterizing our homes. Or at least our pantries. And in this home, that means stocking up on seasonal soups to warm our bodies when the outside temperature drops.

Now lest you think that buying soup is not a worthwhile purchase to feed a family, allow me to let you in on our family’s simple and hearty soup secret…Soup Bulking.  This simple concept allows for an easy meal (soup in a can) to be transformed into a hearty dish that feeds several people.

Add fresh ingredients to canned soup to make it hearty.

The only thing thing you do differently is saute extra ingredients before adding the main soup. For me, that typically involves 1/4 of an onion, clove of garlic, a carrot or two, a potato, and seasonings to match the soup’s flavor. My latest favorites are Aldi’s German soups, and I see that they added two new flavors this year (one is German Bean).  I have tested out the Pea Soup, German Bean, and the Lentil Soup…and I recommend them all!

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Look for soups with hearty ingredients to fill you up faster!

If you want a step-by-step recipe-like guide, keep reading. As a side dish, I typically make  a varied ethnic food (which will be another post) that provides a satisfying helping of whole grains. However another option is simply make grilled cheese sandwiches on whole grain bread to serve with the soup. Can’t go wrong with grilled cheese. Happy Eating!

Ingredients

1-2 T Olive Oil

1/4-1/2 Onion, chopped

1-2 Carrots, peeled and chopped

1 Potato, chopped

Handful of Mushrooms, chopped

Can of Hearty Soup (the more bulk, the better)

Directions: Heat Oil in medium sized pot on medium heat. While it’s heating, chop your fresh ingredients and add all but the mushrooms to the pot. Saute for about 2 min, then add the mushrooms, and saute again for about a minute. Add the can of soup, cover and bring to a boil. If soup has a lot of water in it, simmer uncovered until it reaches desired thickness. Serve over rice or with polenta/ugali (cornmeal dishes) or injera (Ethiopian bread) for hearty and healthy warm winter meal!

Serves 2-4 people.

 

Bon Appetit…Slowly! A Case Study to Test the Feasibility of Mindful Eating

It’s been said that in France, people eat a bit differently than in the US. I hear that meals take longer (2+ hours), they share meals, they eat three main meals (not many snacks), and do not house many fast food joints. All these factors seem to contribute to the fact that the French boast lower obesity rates than their Western counterparts of Canada, UK and the USA, at around 23% (compared to 34% in the US.)  In addition to these differences, a key factor supposedly accounts for their leanness: Eating Slowly.

Intuitive Eatingas it’s called, is the idea of eating for satisfaction, focusing on balanced nutrition, but not dieting, on fullness but not restriction. In their book, Intuitive Eating: A Revolutionary Program that Works, authors Evelyn Tribole (MS, RD) and Elyse Resche (MS, RDN) highlight three aspects to eating, including Slow, Savor and Sensual, in that “by slowing down and savoring, we can notice the enjoyable qualities of food and recognize when we’re comfortably satisfied (Brown, Kelsey, MEd, CHES Stop Dieting, Start Intuitive Eating).”

Indeed, the research backs up this theory as well. In a Pediatric Obesity Journal report, children who chewed each bite for 30 seconds as instructed, and drank water before each meal, lost more weight than the control group. And another study in the Obesity Journal notes that after a one-year intervention, obese participants in a mindfulness centered eating plan improved fasting glucose and HDL cholesterol levels better than their counterparts.

All great news for those of us who like to enjoy a calm, leisurely meal.

 

It sounded so easy, in fact, that when I returned home from a mini family vacation in the down-home, slow-paced cornfields of Iowa, that I determined to give this cow-paced eating a try.  So what follows is a Day-by-Day recap and case study toIMG_20170805_150114565_HDR determine if it is actually possible to enjoy (and even SAVOR!) your meals while eating with your children. Young children, I might add.

 

 

Originally the case study ran seven days. But unfortunately I failed to keep up with my log after Day 4, and due to the mental deterioration associated with motherhood.  I can only offer you my incomplete, yet scientifically grounded yet-to-be-officially-published, 4-Day study. The guidelines for my trial included chewing each bite completely, preferably at least 10 times; no reading of paper or using the phone during meals; sit-down at the table; and occasionally put down utensils to emphasize mindfulness.

 

 

 

For no apparent reason, I included my actual meal for you, maybe to inspire, maybe to intrigue.

DAY 1 (Sunday): BreakfastOatmeal, Smoothie and Tea

*Note* Recovering from respiratory infection.

ResultSUCCESS! Due to being sick, I had no appetite, so what I did eat, I had to force myself to eat.

Lunch: Ugali with Lentil Soup 

Result: Appetite apparently improving, as my husband reminds me that I’m supposed to be eating slowly.

Dinner: Veggie Burgers with roasted veggies and a salad

Result: Success! Day 1 Complete! This will be a breeze.

DAY 2: Breakfast: Scrambled egg wraps and fruit medley 

Result: Half-Success. Enjoyed half of breakfast in peace until the toddler came in to attack the fruit. Potty training mode begins. Extra challenge to eat slowly upon return to the table, knowing the electric company was scheduled to come at 9!

Lunch: Boiled egg sandwich, salad, orange

Result: Success! Due to electric company invading our home, we lunched at my parents. Not much going on, so a very mindful meal.

Dinner: Leftover Soup and Ugali

Result: Half-Success. I successfully put my utensil down often during my meal, so as to accommodate the insistent 9 month old piranha  baby, who also wanted to eat, but apparently not following our slow-eating trial.

DAY 3: Breakfast: Leftover Oatmeal with Banana, with Tea

Result: FAIL. Needed to be at work by 5:45 for my first client, so needless to say I chose extra sleep over rising early. Did not finish breakfast until mid-morning.

Lunch: Cereal with strawberries

Result: Fail. Read the paper while trying to eat, then just read paper as baby decided she wanted mama’s milk NOW. An attempt to continue eating resulted in the piranha baby abruptly stopping to investigate what I put in my mouth. Finished my lunch (quickly) after she went down for her nap.

Dinner: Fish, baked potatoes, steamed carrots

Result: Fail. Issued one toddler timeout due to unruly behavior, with a continued battle to sit still, while simultaneously finger feeding the piranha baby and utensil feeding myself.

DAY 4: Breakfast: (memory loss…coffee?)

Lunch: Leftover veggies with a peanut butter & banana wrap

Result: Fail. Upon returning from work, my first parental duty involved enforcing nap time. This began around 2pm (after I heated up lunch), and ended a little after 3, at which point I ate my meal sporadically standing up, while repeatedly chasing toddler back to his lair.

Supper: Pasta with broccoli

Result: Semi-Success! Enjoyed a relatively calm meal for half of the time, while spoon feeding baby. Also felt satisfactorily full upon completion.

Conclusion: Luckily for you, there’s really no need to see the rest of the week’s study, since it basically repeated itself.  Surprisingly, the biggest challenge actually involved me not reading the paper, or reading anything, actually. To sit, and just munch. Munch. Munch. I suppose it might have knit my heart more closely to my meal, but in reality I found it very boring. I can’t say why, but reading while eating (alone) is a cherished pastime, one that happens less frequently than I prefer.

So if mindful eating requires deliberate chomps, fork table touches, and staring blissfully across the room for an hour, I think I might have to take early retirement from parenting.

In the meantime, I might take a trip to France to find a mom’s group, and gather empirical evidence on this mindful eating nonsense concept.

 

*As a follow up, I must say I just enjoyed a slow-paced dinner (while reading the paper). The trick? Put the kids in bed early. Then go eat supper. 🙂

 

 

 

References: ProCon. The Leading Source for Controversial Issues. Global Obesity Levels. http://obesity.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=006032#global-levels. 4/28/2016.

Archer, Shirley. Mindful Eating and Type 2 Diabetes. http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/mindful-eating-and-type-2-diabetes. 9/22/2016.

Brown, Kelsey. Stop Dieting, Start Intuitive Eating. Idea Fitness Journal, February 2017.

Webster. Sandy Todd. Coaching Kids to Eat More Slowly Can Slash Weight. http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/coaching-kids-to-eat-more-slowly-can-slash-weight-0. 04/21/2016.

 

 

 

Bon Appetit…Slowly! A Case Study to Test the Feasibility of Mindful Eating

It’s been said that in France, people eat a bit differently than in the US. I hear that meals take longer (2+ hours), they share meals, they eat three main meals (not many snacks), and do not house many fast food joints. All these factors seem to contribute to the fact that the French boast lower obesity rates than their Western counterparts of Canada, UK and the USA, at around 23% (compared to 34% in the US.)  In addition to these differences, a key factor supposedly accounts for their leanness: Eating Slowly.

Intuitive Eatingas it’s called, is the idea of eating for satisfaction, focusing on balanced nutrition, but not dieting, on fullness but not restriction. In their book, Intuitive Eating: A Revolutionary Program that Works, authors Evelyn Tribole (MS, RD) and Elyse Resche (MS, RDN) highlight three aspects to eating, including Slow, Savor and Sensual, in that “by slowing down and savoring, we can notice the enjoyable qualities of food and recognize when we’re comfortably satisfied (Brown, Kelsey, MEd, CHES Stop Dieting, Start Intuitive Eating).”

Indeed, the research backs up this theory as well. In a Pediatric Obesity Journal report, children who chewed each bite for 30 seconds as instructed, and drank water before each meal, lost more weight than the control group. And another study in the Obesity Journal notes that after a one-year intervention, obese participants in a mindfulness centered eating plan improved fasting glucose and HDL cholesterol levels better than their counterparts.

All great news for those of us who like to enjoy a calm, leisurely meal.

It sounded so easy, in fact, that when I returned home from a mini-family vacation in the down-home, slow-paced cornfields of Iowa, that I determined to give this cow-paced eating a try.  So what follows is a Day-by-Day recap and case study to determine if it is actually possible to enjoy (and even SAVOR!) your meals while eating with your children. Young children, I might add.

Originally the case study ran seven days. But unfortunately I failed to keep up with my log after Day 4, and due to the mental deterioration associated with motherhood, I can only offer you my incomplete, yet scientifically grounded yet-to-be-officially-published, 4-Day study. The guidelines for my trial included chewing each bite completely, preferably at least 10 times; no reading of paper or using the phone during meals; sit-down at the table; and occasionally put down utensils to emphasize mindfulness.

For no apparent reason, I included my actual meal for you, maybe to inspire, maybe to intrigue.

DAY 1 (Sunday): BreakfastOatmeal, Smoothie and Tea

*Note* Recovering from respiratory infection.

ResultSUCCESS! Due to being sick, I had no appetite, so what I did eat, I had to force myself to eat.

Lunch: Ugali with Lentil Soup 

Result: Appetite apparently improving, as my husband reminds me that I’m supposed to be eating slowly.

Dinner: Veggie Burgers with roasted veggies and a salad

Result: Success! Day 1 Complete! This will be a breeze.

DAY 2: Breakfast: Scrambled egg wraps and fruit medley 

Result: Half-Success. Enjoyed half of breakfast in peace until the toddler came in to attack the fruit. Potty training mode begins. Extra challenge to eat slowly upon return to the table, knowing the electric company was scheduled to come at 9!

Lunch: Boiled egg sandwich, salad, orange

Result: Success! Due to electric company invading our home, we lunched at my parents. Not much going on, so a very mindful meal.

Dinner: Leftover Soup and Ugali

Result: Half-Success. I successfully put my utensil down often during my meal, so as to accommodate the insistent 9 month old piranha  baby, who also wanted to eat, but apparently not following our slow-eating trial.

DAY 3: Breakfast: Leftover Oatmeal with Banana, with Tea

Result: FAIL. Needed to be at work by 5:45 for my first client, so needless to say I chose extra sleep over rising early. Did not finish breakfast until mid-morning.

Lunch: Cereal with strawberries

Result: Fail. Read the paper while trying to eat, then just read paper as baby decided she wanted mama’s milk NOW. An attempt to continue eating resulted in the piranha baby abruptly stopping to investigate what I put in my mouth. Finished my lunch (quickly) after she went down for her nap.

Dinner: Fish, baked potatoes, steamed carrots

Result: Fail. Issued one toddler timeout due to unruly behavior, with a continued battle to sit still, while simultaneously finger feeding the piranha baby and utensil feeding myself.

DAY 4: Breakfast: (memory loss…coffee?)

Lunch: Leftover veggies with a peanut butter & banana wrap

Result: Fail. Upon returning from work, my first parental duty involved enforcing nap time. This began around 2pm (after I heated up lunch), and ended a little after 3, at which point I ate my meal sporadically standing up, while repeatedly chasing toddler back to his lair.

Supper: Pasta with broccoli

Result: Semi-Success! Enjoyed a relatively calm meal for half of the time, while spoon feeding baby. Also felt satisfactorily full upon completion.

Conclusion: Luckily for you, there’s really no need to see the rest of the week’s study, since it basically repeated itself.  Surprisingly, the biggest challenge actually involved me not reading the paper, or reading anything, actually. To sit, and just munch. Munch. Munch. I suppose it might have knit my heart more closely to my meal, but in reality I found it very boring. I can’t say why, but reading while eating (alone) is a cherished pastime, one that happens less frequently than I prefer.

So if mindful eating requires deliberate chomps, fork table touches, and staring blissfully across the room for an hour, I think I might have to take early retirement from parenting.

In the meantime, I might take a trip to France to find a mom’s group, and gather empirical evidence on this mindful eating nonsense concept.

 

*As a follow up, I must say I just enjoyed a slow-paced dinner (while reading the paper). The trick? Put the kids in bed early. Then go eat supper. 🙂

 

 

 

References: ProCon. The Leading Source for Controversial Issues. Global Obesity Levels. http://obesity.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=006032#global-levels. 4/28/2016.

Archer, Shirley. Mindful Eating and Type 2 Diabetes. http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/mindful-eating-and-type-2-diabetes. 9/22/2016.

Brown, Kelsey. Stop Dieting, Start Intuitive Eating. Idea Fitness Journal, February 2017.

Webster. Sandy Todd. Coaching Kids to Eat More Slowly Can Slash Weight. http://www.ideafit.com/fitness-library/coaching-kids-to-eat-more-slowly-can-slash-weight-0. 04/21/2016.