Fun-tastic Fitness, Part 2. Indoor Fitness Fun

In my last post, I shared the grim statistics that most Americans are not getting enough daily physical activity to warrant health benefits, and also that most people see exercise as a chore, which decreases the likelihood that they will engage in it. In an encouraging light, research also confirms what we suspected was true… that “the health status of the parents is intricately linked to that of their children.” In other words, the health habits of children typically reflect the habits of the parents (with the exception of the bottomless intake of sugar a child can ingest, particularly after a parade).

The encouragement in this type of research reflects the power of influence that parents have over their children’s healthy habits.  Possibly more than education, income, zip code, peer influence and other factors, parents wield power to show children wellness by living it out for them to see on a daily basis.  Even if unhealthy habits are being practiced, the effect of seeing parents battle their habits and eventually win sends powerful and lasting messages to the child that individuals have control over their wellness.

So in light of that hopeful news, I want to continue to Part 2 of Fun-tastic Fitness Ideas. Last time I offered you some fun outdoor exercise ideas, and this time I want to highlight some indoor fitness ideas. These are some of my tried and true experiences with my kids and also with my siblings growing up. I would love to hear what other ideas parents, caregivers or babysitters have come up with!

  • Catch You: As mentioned in last post, this game works great inside also, often dispelling whiny toddler moods into giggles. Just use the cue words, “Catch You!” and start chasing the child. Once caught, tickle or toss the child onto the bed. This usually turns into the next activity…
  • Airplanes: Laying on a bed, have the child stand by your feet and you hold his hands and slowly lift him up, keeping your feet pressed up against his torso, til he is over you in the air, like a plane. Gently bring the plane down to either side for a landing. (Not a recommended activity shortly after eating!)
  • Dancing: Turn on some upbeat music and have a jam session. Actually even mellow music is fine too. I invented my own style of ballroom dance with my 2 year old to the tune of Pachelbel on our keyboard’s song list. Now he turns it on and dances on his own.
  • London Bridges: Classic game of London Bridge Falling Down…you rest your head, neck and shoulders on couch or stability ball while kids crawl under you as you hold the glute bridge position. When you finish the song, you drop (lightly) down on the unfortunate child caught underneath you. Variation: Do Marches in the bridge position.
  • Ping-Pongballoon
  • Balloon Volley-Wally-ball: Divide a room in half with pillows/blankets/scarves, and use an inflated balloon to play volleyball. All the rules of regular volleyball apply
    (except net rules, since there’s no net), in addition to playing the “ball” off of furniture & walls. Set one boundary in the back for service line and the out-of-bounds area. General rule of thumb, anything is a legit hit until it hits the floor!
  • Basket rides: Similar to weighted sled pushes for athletes, this variation puts the child (and likely stuffed animals) in a laundry basket and you push them around the house. Be prepared for tired hamstrings.
  • Jumping contests: Use a broom or yardstick to challenge children and adults alike to see how high they can jump over the stick. Another option is long jump contests..see who can jump the farthest.
  • Stability ball or Bosu bouncing and balancing: Bouncing—Place child on ball but hold it steady with your feet (if sitting) as you bounce them up and down. Balancing—Kneeling on the ball and using wall or couch for support as needed, compete to see who can kneel the longest without holding on or falling off (recommended for older kids).
  • Family Challenge Chart: Pick various exercises (squats, planks, pushups) and make a chart for daily or weekly challenges. Either on the honor policy or with a witness, record each performer to see how many he can do in a minute, or how long she can hold a plank.
  • Whippa!: A true home-spun game that will one day be patented…use two pieces of furniture (ideally couches) as the safe areas. One person is “it” wielding a winter scarf, and must be kneeling while she is it. Runners dash back and forth between couches trying to avoid getting “whipped” by the scarf. If tagged 3 times, the runner becomes it.

 

 

References: Vedanthan et al. April 12, 2016. Cardiovascular Health PromotionFamily-Based Approaches to Cardiovascular Health. promotionhttp://www.onlinejacc.org/content/accj/67/14/1725.full.pdf

 

 

Fun-tastic Fitness: Making Exercise Fun for the Whole Family (Part 1)

If you’re like many parents, a quiet house at the end of the day or for a few hours during nap time brings great delight that we can finally enjoy “me” time. That could mean a variety of things, such as checking in with social media or writing blogs, or catching up on the endless list of chores around the house. Rarely, this might be used as the time to get in an exercise routine.  But movin’ and groovin’ to our workout playlist might arouse the youngsters from their slumbers, and that’s not a risk most parents want to take.

Fortunately, for the many parents grieving the loss of their workout days, or for those wishing for extra time and energy to fit a routine into their day…hope exists. And even better news…for those who conjure up images of slow-motion minutes on the treadmill and weight-lifting boredom, exercising does not have to be a chore. Movement brings joy, and when you do it with kids, it usually brings some laughs too.

A recent article reminded me of how far we have strayed from this concept. “Embracing the Joy of Movement,” by fitness pro Ryan Halvorson (http://bit.ly/2qkCu2t), brings many thoughts together about why the vast majority of Americans don’t get enough exercise. Indeed 80% of the Americans don’t meet the physical activity recommendations (21 min/day or 150 min/wk) and only 55% are active enough to make health improvements. The bottom line reason for inactivity is that individuals don’t find it fun. As Halvorson quotes from Michelle Segar, PhD, MPH fitness expert and author at University of Michigan, “The core issue is that in our society, our prescription/lecturing perspective has turned exercise into a chore…the vast majority of people don’t exercise, and the reason they don’t is because we [fitness industry] have alienated them by limiting its purpose in their lives.”

Sadly, much truth rings from those words. We often feel guilty about missing “workouts,” rather than valuing the amount of movement we already put into a day.  And we lament each day that passes without exercise, dreaming of a period where free time comes in abundance.

Another challenge, as Halvorson points out, by quoting another expert, Katy Bowman (biochemist and author), “Traditional training programs require exercise to occur outside of your house. They require extra money, special outfits and shoes, arrangements for someone to watch our children, and an instructor or trainer.” Of course I don’t want to downplay the importance of trainers and fitness professionals (hello, job security!); yet it’s important to recognize the barriers that keep inactive individuals from engaging in movement. In addition, I want to encourage parents, especially of young children, that you might already be more active than you realize. (There’s a reason we don’t get enough sleep!)

So if you’re looking for simple and fun ways to add or enhance your physical activity levels, and perhaps bring it up to the moderate-vigorous intensity to warrant health benefits, I want to provide you some ideas that I’ve used, some from growing up with my many siblings (9!), where we invented cheap forms of entertainment by necessity; and others with my own two children (2 and 7 months). Hopefully you find yourself inspired to create new activities…you are only limited by your imagination! In Part 1, I will share outdoor fun fitness activities. Next week I plan to share successful indoor fun fitness ideas!

OUTDOOR FITNESS FUN

IMG_20170421_164629499Monkey bars–adult favorites at the park!
 

  • Parks: The obvious outdoor movement choice. Familiarize yourself with your local parks, many of them provide challenges for adults too (think Monkey bars). Plus the added bonus of enjoying nature will give you an energy boost too.
  • Biking: one word, Hills
  • Tee-ball, catch, Softball 500 game in park or back yard: 500: batter self-pitches, outfielders battle for the ball, 100pts for fly ball, 75 for one bounce grounder, 50 for two bounces, 25 for three or more. First to 500 pts becomes the batter.
  • Running bases: Two people throw a ball back and forth between “safe” areas; runners run back and forth avoiding a tag from person with the ball. Three tags requires runner to switch with tagger.
    IMG_20170422_112530494

    Creative park ideas—practice balance or jump over the bench.
  • Tag…so many variations of this game and the game is timelessly fun
  • Mother May I? “Mother” faces away from participants who start at a distance away. One at a time, each person asks “Mother may I [insert activity]? Options include run, skip, hop, etc. Mother approves or denies request (if denied, offers another option). Once approved, requester begins moving and Mother turns around at any moment to “catch” the person in movement. If caught, mover returns to start and next person makes a request. First person to reach Mother switches places.
  • Jump rope: Grab two ropes and make it a double-Dutch fun, or competitions of who can jump the most before snagging it with the foot. Use variations of two feet, single feet, backwards, boxer hop, eyes closed, double-jump and more!
  • Soccer/Kickball: Sprinting, kicking, chasing…heart’s racing in minutes!
  • Trampoline: Ok, I know it’s #1 on the pediatrician’s “Don’t get this Toy for Kids” list, but wow, we had a lot of fun on this as kids. And zero broken bones or serious injuries. Just a lot of good times. For
    10399290_15019257113_4692_n
    Perhaps a little extreme…but the fun on the trampoline is simply endless.

    liability purposes, of course, I am not responsible for any injuries you may incur on this device (it’s 2017, after all…gotta cover all my bases)!

  • Ladder/Hopscotch: The agility ladder is a great tool that conditioning coaches use for athletes, especially for sports that require quick reflexes (basketball, tennis, etc). But you don’t need to buy a ladder to get the same results. All you need is some sidewalk chalk to draw boxes on the ground and use your imagination for creating ways to get quickly through the ladder during various things (hopping, running, shuffling). Or you can get some ideas from YouTube. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67XP-AekUoA
  • Racing: Anything! Kids, especially little kids, are naturally social, so they consider most interaction, including competition, fun. You can make a game of just about anything. Few examples: We have two toy lawn mowers and my son would frequently ask me to “mow” with him. This was not overly appealing to me since I had to hunch over to use it, and pretend mowing is well, pretend. So I instead invented a new game…race the lawn mowers down the driveway! He loved it andIMG_20161125_140356562 so did I (for awhile, anyway).  Another example is our “Catch you” Game (explained more in Inside Fun). But the main gist is the cue phrase “Catch you” turns whatever we are doing into a game of chase, and we have to catch him as he runs. This is a great tool for pokey bike riders and daydreaming walkers.
  • Forest Preserves/Nature Centers: Often overlooked and underused (in my opinion), a serene getaway and nature hike is often only minutes away. Although maybe more ideal for walking aged children, I’ve hiked with the baby carrier also, which adds additional benefit for resistance training.
IMG_20170314_125028944.jpg
Bundle up and pull in the laundry basket! 
  •  Winter activities: Sledding, Snowmen (and women), forts…in fact just getting all the winter gear on and sweating from it seems beneficial. And I seriously forgot until this past year how much a snowman’s torso weighs.

Hopefully you benefit from some of these ideas and even create your own ideas from what you see around you. Come back next week to check out Indoor Fitness Fun Ideas! In the meantime, I would love to know what other ideas people have for outdoor family fun!

 

Back…with Babies!

Once again, my blogging ambitions took a lengthy hiatus, although I’m doubtful many people noticed. But this time I have a good excuse (at least that’s what I’ve been told…this excuse works for just about anything you avoid doing).

Yes, I’ve entered the world where babbles, coos, spit-ups, diapers, time-outs, messy floors, sticky fingers, child locks, car seats, and every thing else baby runs my life. I never imagined the real Little People could consume so much attention while simultaneously unearthing a full spectrum of emotions from the adults called parents. Yes, indeed, I continue to learn daily about my own emotional shortcomings, especially in the area of patience.

Yet I have to admit, most of the time I actually enjoy this life. True, it involves a lot of work and discipline. But I still spend more time laughin
g, smiling and playing than being annoyed. For me, the two words often on my mind

IMG_20170421_141919323

 

Free Entertainment: A walking blanket disguised as a child supposedly taking a nap.

 

watching these bambinos (as my husband calls them)…Free Entertainment! 

So with the change of lifestyle, I felt moved to change the direction of the blog, andgear it towards a specific audience that I’ve come to know better. As I continue personal training on the side, I am constantly hearing from moms looking for fitness help after baby. And let’s face it, parenting is overwhelming. A single day just doing chores and keeping kids alive would earn us a CEO ranking for work ethic in any corporate company. It’s no wonder we put our health on the back burner while we strive to raise responsible citizens.

Yet I believe it is possible (and even fun!) to live healthy and fit as a parent. And this lifestyle can be achieved even with infants who demand constant attention and sedentary positions for feeding. What makes success possible? Two things:

  1. Goals: Just like raising kids, we don’t expect them to perfect motor skills in one day, or even a week. Setting baby steps for achievable goals slowly transforms our wellness from periodic salads to intentional, nutritional meals.
  2. Education: When we bring home a baby, we have Google at our fingertips to advise us on every movement the baby makes. The same is true for health…the more you know, the more you grow (your mind), which in turn changes behavior.

So I hope as you read this re-branded blog, if you are a parent, that you find helpful advice for your home life. And if you are not a parent but reading this blog, I hope you find solid health tips, and maybe even an awareness to the challenges your parenting friends may be going through. We could all use a helping hand, right?

Tune in next week as I discuss how to put Fun into Fitness (kid involvement highly recommended)!

 

EPIPHANY IN THE SINK

Although my blog has officially been up for a year and a half, I’ve been lax over its upkeep, to say the very least.  My average posting rate is probably similar to a lot of people’s exercise routines…non-existent.  And my excuses are probably not much different…busy with life, work, family, church, volunteering, etc.  Unless it’s a fixture in my routine, and there’s an concerted effort on my part to make this succeed, my blog’s future will probably end up much like the martini shaker that my husband & I got for a wedding gift three years ago: it seemed like such a great idea to put it on the registry, never mind the fact that we hardly ever drink.

 

I’m guessing that I’m not alone in my struggle to start a new habit, and then fail.  It seems that a lot of people face that same conflict, especially seen around every New Year’s Day, when magazines, health clubs, and every business in America pounces on consumers to make new resolutions.  It seems there is a profound desire in every person to better themselves, and despite the adage that says “People don’t like change,” I tend to think that with the right motivation and achievable results, people actually do pursue change.  The problems come when motivation diminishes, and the results seem gargantuan.

 

Enter my new motivation for this blog.  Well, let’s first start with my first motivation, which was to provide an understandable, yet scientific site for individuals to embrace healthy lifestyles.  Since I possessed little knowledge of the blogosphere, I looked to my husband’s example. He writes on religion, Muslim evangelism, and current events.  He does a lot of research, and writes scholarly articles for Yahoo!.  He pores over articles and sometimes takes weeks to write a post for his blog.  Needless to say, that approach proved rather daunting to me; so daunting, in fact, that I entered a blogging paralysis.  I realized that while scientific articles offer great perspective, they also take a lot of time, which I tend to lose all the time.

 

So 583 days later, I had an epiphany where most great epiphanies take place…washing dishes.  I thought about the lifestyle changes I’ve made since entering the fitness career field, and how easy many of them have actually been.  Then I thought, why don’t I write about that for my blog?  Personal experience is way more motivating and fun to write about than research.  Although I haven’t completely given up on my first ambition, my new motivation is simply this…to write on a conglomeration of topics, from recipes to fitness gear to exercise studies…anything fitness or health related that I find interesting that I hope interests you as well.

 

I hope my newfound motivation speaks into your life as well, and that you will be challenged and encouraged by my posts to jumpstart your own ambitions.  And in the mean time, I hope you enjoy the posts to come!

 

Roses and Thorns

A few years ago, our pastor shared this story (written by our visitation pastor) in our Thanksgiving service. It touched my heart then, and every time I read it, my eyes fill with tears as I consider the truth of it all. I share this story with you on the eve of Thanksgiving 2011 as a reminder that in the midst of the things we need to be thankful for, we must thank God for the thorns He places in our lives, whether or not we understand why they are there. Be blessed, my friends.

 “Why me, Lord?”

This question has been asked many times when days of perplexity and confusion arise. We all have gone through circumstances that were beyond our ability to explain. We begin to wonder if God really loves us or if we are one of His children. Why must we go through such difficult times? This is a question that always looms up before us.

When we have tried to give of our best service to the Lord, shouldn’t we expect Him to shield us from such trying experiences? After all, it is not uncommon to find the unbeliever going through easy times while we are struggling with a huge pile of grief.

“Why me, Lord?”

This is perhaps the most frequent question that has been asked of me during my years of ministry. It is undoubtedly one of the most difficult ones to answer adequately for the one who is suffering.

I recently came across and interesting approach to this subject in a Christian publication. I thought the answer and the conclusion is one that we need to face squarely to put our problems into perspective.

Sandra felt as low as the heels of her Birkenstocks as she pushed against a November gust and the florist shop door. Her life had been easy, like a spring breeze. Then in the fourth month of her second pregnancy, a minor automobile accident stole her ease.

During this Thanksgiving week she would have delivered a son. She grieved over her loss. As if that weren’t enough, her husband’s company threatened a transfer. Then her sister, whose holiday visit she coveted, called saying she could not come. What’s worse, Sandra’s friend infuriated her by suggesting her grief was a God-given path to maturity that would allow her to sympathize with others who suffer. “She has no idea what I’m feeling,” thought Sandra with a shudder.

Thanksgiving? Thankful for what?, she wondered.

For a careless driver whose truck was hardly scratched when he rear-ended her? For an airbag that saved her life but took that of her child?

“Good afternoon, can I help you?” The shop clerk’s approach startled her.

“I..I need an arrangement,” stammered Sandra. “For Thanksgiving? Do you want beautiful but ordinary, or would you like to challenge the day with a customer favorite I call the Thanksgiving “Special?” asked the shop clerk. “I’m convinced that flowers tell stories,” she continued.

“Are you looking for something that conveys ‘gratitude’ this Thanksgiving?”

“Not exactly!” Sandra blurted out. “In the last five months, everything that could go wrong has gone wrong.”

Sandra regretted her outburst, and was surprised when the shop clerk said, “I have the perfect arrangement for you.” Then the shop’s door small bell rang, and the shop clerk said, “Hi, Barbara. let me get your order.” She politely excused herself and walked toward a small workroom, then quickly reappeared, carrying an arrangement of greenery, bows, and long-stemmed thorny roses. Except the ends of the rose stems were neatly snipped: there were no flowers on the ends

“Want this in a box?” asked the clerk.

Sandra watched for the customer’s response. Was this a joke? Who would want rose stems with no flowers! She waited for laughter, but neither woman laughed.

“Yes, please,” Barbara replied with an appreciative smile. “You’d think after three years of getting the special, I wouldn’t be so moved by its significance, but I can feel it right here, all over again.” She said as she gently tapped her chest.

“Uh,” stammered Sandra, “that lady just left with, uh…she just left with no flowers!”

“Right, said the clerk, “I cut off the flowers. That’s the Special. I call it the Thanksgiving Thorns Bouquet.”

“Oh, come on, you can’t tell me someone is willing to pay for that!” exclaimed Sandra.

“Barbara came into the shop three years ago feeling much like you feel today,” explained the clerk. “She thought she had very little to be thankful for. She had lost her father to cancer, the family business was failing, her son was into drugs, and she was facing major surgery.”

“That same year I had lost my husband,” continued the clerk, “and for the first time in my life, had just spent the holidays alone. I had no children, no husband, no family nearby, and too great a debt to allow any travel.”

“So what did you do?” asked Sandra. “I learned to be thankful for thorns,” answered the clerk quietly. “I’ve always thanked God for good things in life and never to ask Him why those good things happened to me, but when bad stuff hit, did I ever ask! It took time for me to learn that dark times are important. I have always enjoyed the ‘flowers’ of life, but it took thorns to show me the beauty of God’s comfort. You know, the Bible says that God comforts us when we’re afflicted, and from His consolation we learn to comfort others.”

Sandra sucked in her breath as she thought about the very thing her friend had tried to tell her. “I guess the truth is I don’t want comfort. I’ve lost a baby and I’m angry with God.” Just then someone else walked in the shop.

“Hey, Phil!” shouted the clerk to the balding, rotund man. “My wife sent me in to get our usual Thanksgiving arrangement, twelve thorny, long-stemmed stems!” laughed Phil as the clerk handed him a tissue-wrapped arrangement from the refrigerator.

“Those are for your wife?” asked Sandra incredulously. “Do you mind me asking why she wants something that looks like that?”

“No…I’m glad you asked,” Phil replied. “Four years ago my wife and I nearly divorced. After forty years, we were in a real mess, but with the Lord’s grace and guidance, we slogged through problem after problem. He rescued our marriage. Jenny here (the clerk) told me she kept a vase of rose stems to remind her of what she learned from “thorny” times, and that was good enough for me. I took home some of those stems. My wife and I decided to label each one for a specific “problem” and give thanks for what that problem taught us.”

As Phil paid the clerk, he said to Sandra, “I highly recommend the Special!”

“I don’t know if I can be thankful for the thorns in my life.” Sandra said to the clerk. “It’s all too fresh.”

“Well,” the clerk replied carefully, “my experience has shown me that thorns make roses more precious. We treasure God’s providential care more during trouble than at any other time. Remember, it was a crown of thorns that Jesus wore so we might know His love. Don’t resent the thorns.”

Tears rolled down Sandra’s cheeks. For the first time since the accident, she loosened her grip on resentment. “I’ll take those twelve long-stemmed thorns, please,” she managed to choke out.

“I hoped you would,” said the clerk gently. “I’ll have them ready in a minute.”

“Thank you. What do I owe you?”

“Nothing, nothing but a promise to allow God to heal your heart. The first year’s arrangement is always on me.”

The clerk smiled and handed a card to Sandra. “I’ll attach this card to your arrangement, but maybe you would like to read it first.”

It read: My God, I have never thanked You for my thorns. I have thanked You a thousand times for my roses, but never once for my thorns. Teach me the glory of the cross I bear; teach me the value of my thorns. Show me that I have climbed closer to You along the path of pain. Show me that, through my tears, the colors of Your rainbow look much more brilliant.”

Praise Him for your roses, thank Him for your thorns.

Have you thanked God for the thorns in your life? Have you learned lessons from them?

Pastor Paul Eldridge

Defining the Core

Featured

Anyone interested in fitness lingo, or has sustained a back injury, has likely encountered a therapist or fitness enthusiast who loves telling people about the importance of “the Core.”  This mysterious and powerfully functional aspect of the body has nothing do with eating apples, and everything to do with developing efficient & stable muscles.  Although professionals tend to overuse the word, the idea behind core stabilization remains significant, and understanding it can help individuals develop muscle strength, and reduce injury risk.  Today we’ll look at a basic “core” definition, explain some reasons for it’s importance, and provide a few basic exercises to help develop the area.

In Certified News of American Council on Exercise (ACE) June/July 2008, contributer Fabio Comana, M.A, M.S. describes the core as “the ability to control the position and motion of the trunk relative to the pelvis and legs (9). ” This means that the core of the body functions the same way as a building foundation; it provides stabilization for the major muscle groups (back, pelvis, legs).  The strength & efficiency of these major muscle groups contributes to postural control, balance, coordination and overall movement.   Incorporating core exercises into daily regiments can greatly enhance functional activities, as well as overall health.

The authors of the Second Edition of The Essentials of Strength & Conditioning define core exercises as those which “recruit one or more large muscle areas (i.e. chest, shoulder, back, hip, or thigh), involve two or more primary joints, and receive priority when selecting exercises because of their direct application to the sport.” This definition may appear somewhat vague, until compared with the idea of “assistance exercises,” exercises that recruit smaller muscles (neck, biceps) and involve only one primary joint (Baechle & Earle 398).  Single-joint exercises include some basics, like bicep curls, knee extensions, shoulder rows, ab crunches & neck circles.

Core exercises, on the other hand, involve the cooperation of 2+ large muscle groups, and can work in several planes.  A lunge, for example, is a core exercise because when performed correctly, it recruits the quadriceps muscles as the knee flexes, and also the glute muscles as the posterior hip extends.

Another component to core exercises involves the idea of stabilization, or developing supportive muscles.  The concept here is explained in the 3rd Ed. ACE Personal Trainer Manual as exercises that “challenge the abdominal and back muscles to hold the spine in the appropriate position during movement of the extremities (Bryant & Green 271).”  Basically this means that to develop the support of large muscle groups, there must be tests of muscular endurance, often in static positions, and involving more than one plane.

A few examples of this concept would be a single-leg balance pose, bird-dog pose (see below), and the basic plank position (see below).

The importance of core exercises comes into play when paired with daily activities, & common muscle functions.  How often, for example, do people go up & down stairs, putting their bodies through a modified version of a reverse lunge?  Or down to the toilet or chair & back up, for a squat?  Or reaching behind furniture to pick up something hard to reach, much like a single-leg deadlift?  Some of these basic movements often become difficult when the muscles become shortened, underused or injured.  Performing core strengthening & stabilizing exercises regularly reduces the pain and/or inability of basic tasks.

For fitness novices & experts alike, core exercises remain vital to the overall longevity and health of muscles.  Performing exercises like the ones below can help almost anyone develop a strong & stable foundation for the rest of their body to live in.  Individuals at any fitness level can perform core exercises, as modifications or challenges can usually be incorporated.  Start with the basics, and gradually progress to greater challenges.  And as always, consider it a joy that you have the ability to exercise!

All images are property of ACE Fitness.  Complete descriptions of exercises can be found at the ACE Fitness website.

When Will You Quit?

Borrowing the title from Brad Bloom’s Faith & Fitness future discussion forum, the start of 2011 presents not only a good time to think of new beginnings, but also of new “quittings.”  Many times, to start something, we must first quit another thing, whatever it is that’s holding us back from our starting.  We realize that to “Let God,”  we must first “Let Go” of “every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us (Heb. 12:1).

So with the beginning of a brand new year, we see people that generally fall into three categories of thought. 1-Resolutions of Failure-those who avoid making resolutions because they believe resolutions are “set-ups for failure.” ; 2-Vague Resolutioners–those who verbally express goals but have no plan of action to reach them. ; 3-Persistent Resolutioners-goal oriented people who set goals and have specific ideas on accomplishing them, and often reach their goals.   Regardless of which group you find yourself in, there is no doubt that the need for new beginnings resides in each of us.  And so to start, we must first quit.

Quit elevating comfort over betterment.  Quit pushing God aside.  Quit making excuses.  Quit loving taste over nutrition.  Quit being vague about our goals.

When we quit, we allow God to start something new in us.

Start a friendship.  Start a vibrant prayer & devotional life.  Start giving without grieving.  Start making reasons for starting.  Start adding nutrients into our consumption.  Start setting specific actions to reach your goals.  Start living the abundant life.

Ps. 144:9 – “I will sing a new song to You, O God.”

Luke 22:20 – “Likewise He also took the cup after supper, saying, “This cup is the new covenant in My blood, which is shed for you.”

2 Corinthians 5:17- “Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, he isnew creation; old things have passed away; behold, all things have become new.”

Rev. 21:5 – “Then He who sat on the throne said, “Behold, I make all things new.”

Jesus is in the business of making raggedy, old and worn people and transforming them into beautiful new creations of His design.  Do not resist His Spirit…let him create something new in your life today.

Blessings to you for 2011!